Operating Mutual Funds - how these profit exploding money makers actually work

Although investing in mutual funds isn't the type of subject associated with wild parties and celebrations - it is something the serious investor should consider as a way of increasing their total worth.

"But what EXACTLY is a mutual fund" I hear you ask - "how does it work, who does what and how much do they cost?"

Hang on, slow down - one question at a time please.

What exactly is a mutual fund?

Mutual funds are sold in shares to the public, allowing them to own different percentages of the fund depending on the amount they invest.

Pay more = own more. Own more = get more $$ back again (theoretically)

Simple.

Stocks, bonds, money market securities and the like are purchased through the assets of these mutual funds in the financial markets. Shareholders indirectly own the assets held in the mutual fund, but the fund is guided by the investment company that finds the best way to earn the biggest return. (Indirectly owning the assets through these funds allows them to avoid the big tax hit.)


How does a Mutual Fund work?

Usually, mutual funds are also known as open-ended investment companies. This means that they constantly issue new shares and redeem existing shares, but not all mutual funds are open however. Some mutual funds are 'locked' where they no longer will take on new investors.

The fund's Net Asset Value is the key concept to understanding how a mutual fund operates. By this value you can determine the value of a share of the fund at any time. The market value of the fund's assets less any liabilities, divided by the number of shares outstanding is the formula to understand Net Asset Value.

If you work through that it will show you exactly how much each share in the fund is worth when you are looking to invest in them. By comparing this number over time you can see the returns earned in a percentage. This is generally all done for you on a funds website or on any of the mutual fund sites that feature stats.



Although investing in mutual funds isn't the type of subject associated with wild parties and celebrations - it is something the serious investor should consider as a way of increasing their total worth.

"But what EXACTLY is a mutual fund" I hear you ask - "how does it work, who does what and how much do they cost?"

Hang on, slow down - one question at a time please.

What exactly is a mutual fund?

Mutual funds are sold in shares to the public, allowing them to own different percentages of the fund depending on the amount they invest.

Pay more = own more. Own more = get more $$ back again (theoretically)

Simple.

Stocks, bonds, money market securities and the like are purchased through the assets of these mutual funds in the financial markets. Shareholders indirectly own the assets held in the mutual fund, but the fund is guided by the investment company that finds the best way to earn the biggest return. (Indirectly owning the assets through these funds allows them to avoid the big tax hit.)


How does a Mutual Fund work?

Usually, mutual funds are also known as open-ended investment companies. This means that they constantly issue new shares and redeem existing shares, but not all mutual funds are open however. Some mutual funds are 'locked' where they no longer will take on new investors.

The fund's Net Asset Value is the key concept to understanding how a mutual fund operates. By this value you can determine the value of a share of the fund at any time. The market value of the fund's assets less any liabilities, divided by the number of shares outstanding is the formula to understand Net Asset Value.

If you work through that it will show you exactly how much each share in the fund is worth when you are looking to invest in them. By comparing this number over time you can see the returns earned in a percentage. This is generally all done for you on a funds website or on any of the mutual fund sites that feature stats.

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