Friday, May 15, 2015

Jittery about your home buying decision? Top 5 ways to overcome it!

It is natural. All homebuyers would have felt it. Why not? It is one of the most important and biggest financial decisions of anybody's life. When the stakes are so high, it is bound to affect us, we do get nervous, but also excited at the same time because buying a home is a big achievement too. So, we at CreditVidya.com decided to pen down a few tips to help you tide over the jitters.
When Archana Menon, a Bangalore-based techie bought a plot near Yelahanka, an upcoming suburb near the new airport, she was ecstatic. But when she finalized on her lender to construct a home on this 2000 square feet plot, she started feeling the butterflies in her stomach. Oh, it was but natural.
Archana had saved about Rs 20,00,000 over seven years of her career. This, she spent on buying the plot. She somehow managed to garner the margin money to build a 3600 square feet house. "When I applied for a loan and it came through I was not worried so much. When I had to sign on the dotted line, I started feeling the butterflies in my stomach. A kind of doubt crept on my mind, if I was doing the right thing by taking a loan."
So here are a few things to keep in mind while buying a home:
  • Think through your decision: When you are deciding to buy a home, take some time to think through your decision. It is important to understand the pros and cons of taking a home loan. Do you have enough to make the downpayment?
  • Understand the market: It is important to study the market before you take the plunge. Is the real estate in your city doing well? If you buy a house, will it appreciate over the coming years? If yes, by how much. There are many ways to find answers to such questions. Read real estate blogs, articles and indices. Keep yourself updated with latest trends in real estate.
  • Check your financial situation: When you take a mortgage, half your net salary may go towards the payment of your equitable monthly installment (EMI) for your home loan. Will you be able to sail through with remaining half? Along with EMIs, you will have to think of savings for kids education, retirement plan and emergency fund. So evaluate your income, savings, investments and expenditure before you think of buying a home.
  •   Evaluate your savings: After you buy a home anything can happen. You could lose your job, the salary of which was being used to pay for your EMI. There may be a family emergency, which requires you to divert your funds. There may be a big home repair running into lakhs of rupees. So it is important to build a contingency fund. We at CrediVidya.com always advice our customers to keep a back up of six-month EMI, so that in a job loss situation, it gives you a window of six months to get back on track.
  •  Listen to your instinct: If something tells you not to buy a house now, don't buy. Sit back and think through. Do not yield to the external pressures and take a decision in hurry.
So, sit back and relax. Rethink your decision of buy a home after following the above-mentioned tips. Live a financially healthy life.
- See more at: http://creditvidya.com/loans/home-loan/jittery-about-your-home-buying-decision-top-five-ways-to-overcome-it-hl145.aspx?utm_source=ScoreUp+Beta+Customers&utm_campaign=62d0a67dac-Articles_2_ScoreUp5_14_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_7598ef9dcb-62d0a67dac-284570365#sthash.xhoHKKLA.dpuf

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Spicy Sausage Naan Bread Sandwiches

Sausage sandwiches in their most basic of forms can be and very often are absolutely delicious. The nature of sausage sandwiches means however that you have a virtually endless number of opportunities to vary the combination and take it to new levels of scrumptiousness. The three basic ways of doing this are to vary the types of sausage used in the sandwich, vary the type of bread you use and vary the nature of the accompaniments or condiments included in the sandwich. The recipes on this page focus on using naan breads as an alternative to traditional, as well as spicing up the sausages and/or the additional inclusions.

Choosing Naan Breads for Sandwiches

Large naan breads are heated and halved for making sandwiches
Large naan breads are heated and halved for making sandwiches
There are two basic choices when selecting naan breads to make a naan bread sandwich and which one you go for is down to availability and personal preference. You can either use one large/standard naan bread and half it, or use two mini naan breads. In both instances, the heating guidelines on the pack should be followed prior to assembling the sandwich.
Additionally, you can of course use different flavoured naan breads, with garlic and coriander (cilantro) being a very popular choice.
Two mini naan breads can be used to make a sandwich
Two mini naan breads can be used to make a sandwich

Bhuna Beef Sausages Naan Bread Sandwich with Rice

Beef sausages in a rich bhuna sauce served on a naan bread sandwich with rice
Beef sausages in a rich bhuna sauce served on a naan bread sandwich with rice

Cook Time

  • Prep time: 15 min
  • Cook time: 35 min
  • Ready in: 50 min
  • Yields: One naan bread sandwich

Ingredients

  • 4 beef sausages
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • ½ teaspoon each of garam masala and medium curry powder
  • 1 tablespoon spicy chilli tomato ketchup, (alternatively 1 teaspoon hot chilli powder)
  • 1 clove of garlic, peeled and grated
  • 8 ounce can chopped tomatoes in tomato juice
  • 3 ounces basmati rice
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon freshly chopped coriander/cilantro
  • 1 naan bread
  • Salt and pepper

    Instructions

    Click thumbnail to view full-size
    Bhuna style sauce ingredientsFrying bhuna spicesBhuna sauce is brought to a simmerBeef sausages are pricked with a forkBeef sausages are added to bhuna style sauceChopped mint is added to turmeric riceTurmeric rice is platedHalf naan is laid on rice bedSpiced beef sausages are laid on half naanBhuna sauce is spooned on top of sausages
    Bhuna style sauce ingredients
    Bhuna style sauce ingredients
    1. Pour the oil in to a medium to large pot or saucepan. Add the curry powder, garam masala and garlic and stir fry over a medium heat for a couple of minutes to fry off the spices.
    2. The ketchup and tomatoes go in to the pot next to be brought to a simmer. The sausages should each be pricked a couple of times and added to the pot to simmer (covered) for a further twenty minutes.
    3. The rice should be washed through a sieve and added to a pot of simmering, salted water along with the turmeric to simmer for ten minutes. It should then be drained and returned to the pot, at which point the chopped coriander/cilantro should be stirred through.
    4. Heat the naan bread per the instructions on the pack and arrange the rice in the form of a bed on a serving plate. Cut the naan in half across the way and lay the larger part on the bed of rice.
    5. Use a pair of cooking tongs to lift the sausages from the pot on to the bottom piece of naan before spooning over some sauce. Lay the top part of the naan bread in place to serve.

    Sausage and Indian Spiced Onion Naan Bread Sandwich

    Pork sausage and Indian spiced onions are served in a naan bread sandwich
    Pork sausage and Indian spiced onions are served in a naan bread sandwich

    Cook Time

    Prep time: 10 min
    Cook time: 10 min
    Ready in: 20 min
    Yields: One naan bread sandwich

    Ingredients

    Instructions

    Click thumbnail to view full-size
    Pork sausages are gently fried in oilHalf naan bread is platedPork sausages are laid on half naan breadIndian spiced onions are spooned on to pork sausages
    Pork sausages are gently fried in oil
    Pork sausages are gently fried in oil
    This is by far the simplest and most straightforward recipe on this page, especially when it is prepared as a means of using up leftover spiced onions and they are not specially made for the sandwich.
    1. Fry the sausages gently in the oil for about ten minutes or until done, turning them frequently.
    2. Heat the naan bread and half across the way. Lay the sausages on the wide half, spoon the spiced onions over the top and add the second half of the naan.

    Spicy Szechuan Tomato Sausage Naan Bread Sandwich

    Sausages and green beans in a spicy szechuan tomato sauce naan bread sandwich with homemade chips
    Sausages and green beans in a spicy szechuan tomato sauce naan bread sandwich with homemade chips

    Cook Time

    Prep time: 5 min*
    Cook time: 15 min*
    Ready in: 20 min*
    Yields: One naan bread sandwich
    *Not including optional chips/fries

    Ingredients

    • 5 skinless pork sausages
    • Vegetable oil for frying
    • 5 ounce pack spicy szechuan tomato stir fry sauce
    • 6 trimmed green beans, chopped to 1 inch pieces
    • 2 mini naan breads
    • Chips or fries to serve (optional)

    Instructions

    Click thumbnail to view full-size
    Spicy szechuan tomato sauce and chopped green beansFrying pork sausagesGreen beans are added to fried sausagesSpicy szechuan tomato sauce is added to sausages and beansSausages and beans are gently simmered in spicy szechuan tomato sauceFirst mini naan bread is platedSausages are lifted on to naan breadBeans and sauce are spooned on top of sausagesSecond mini naan bread is laid on top of spicy sausages and beans
    Spicy szechuan tomato sauce and chopped green beans
    Spicy szechuan tomato sauce and chopped green beans
    1. Gently fry the sausages in the oil, turning frequently, until done. This should take around ten minutes.
    2. Add the green beans to the frying pan along with the spicy tomato sauce. Stir carefully so as not to break the sausages and bring to a simmer for just a couple of minutes to ensure the beans are heated through.
    3. Heat the mini naan breads and lay one on a serving plate. Spoon on the sausages and beans combination and add the second naan.
    4. Serve with chips/fries if desired.

    Spicy Lorne Sausage Naan Bread Sandwiches

    Lorne sausage is a Scottish sausage sold in slices
    Lorne sausage is a Scottish sausage sold in slices
    The following two sandwiches are made using Scottish Lorne sausages (also called sliced sausage or square sausage). While there is every chance that you will not have access to this type of sausage, you could make your own or alternatively, simply use ordinary sausages or a basic burger patty instead.

    Spicy Lorne Sausage and Baked Beans Naan Bread Sandwich

    Smoked paprika and Tabasco spiced baked beans on a Lorne sausage in a naan bread sandwich
    Smoked paprika and Tabasco spiced baked beans on a Lorne sausage in a naan bread sandwich

    Cook Time

    Prep time: 5 min
    Cook time: 10 min
    Ready in: 15 min
    Yields: One naan bread sandwich

    Ingredients

    • 1 Lorne sausage
    • Vegetable oil for frying
    • 8 ounce can baked beans in tomato sauce
    • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
    • ½ teaspoon dried basil
    • Few drops of Tabasco sauce
    • 2 mini naan breads

    Instructions

    Click thumbnail to view full-size
    Frying a Lorne sausageSmoked paprika and basil are added to baked beans in tomato sauceTabasco sauce is an optional addition to the spicy baked beansLorne sausage is laid on naan breadSpicy baked beans are spooned on to Lorne sausage
    Frying a Lorne sausage
    Frying a Lorne sausage
    1. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan and fry the Lorne sausage for approximately five minutes each side over a medium heat (depending upon thickness) until done.
    2. Pour the beans in to a small saucepan and add the smoked paprika, dried basil and Tabasco sauce. Do be careful adding the Tabasco sauce - especially if you're not familiar with how hot it is!
    3. Gently heat the beans over a low heat, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon.
    4. Heat the two mini naan breads and lay one on a serving plate. Lift on the sausage, spoon on the beans and finish with the second naan bread.

    Curried Lorne Sausage and Spicy Egg Naan Bread Sandwich

    A curried Lorne sausage is topped with turmeric spiced egg in a naan bread sandwich
    A curried Lorne sausage is topped with turmeric spiced egg in a naan bread sandwich

    Cook Time

    Prep time: 5 min
    Cook time: 15 min
    Ready in: 20 min
    Yields: One naan bread sandwich

    Ingredients

    • 1 large egg
    • 1 Lorne sausage
    • 1 teaspoon curry powder
    • Vegetable oil for frying
    • 1 teaspoon mayo
    • 1 teaspoon freshly chopped coriander/cilantro
    • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
    • Salt
    • 2 mini naan breads

    Instructions

    Click thumbnail to view full-size
    Curry powder is added to Lorne sausageFrying curried Lorne sausageTurmeric, mayo and coriander are added to hard boiled eggSpicy egg combinationCurried Lorne sausage is laid on naan breadTurmeric spiced egg is spooned on to curried Lorne sausage
    Curry powder is added to Lorne sausage
    Curry powder is added to Lorne sausage
    1. Put the egg in to a small saucepan of cold water, ensuring it is completely covered. Bring the water to a simmer for eight minutes.
    2. When the egg is simmering, rub half the curry powder on each side of the Lorne sausage. Fry in the oil over a medium heat for around five minutes each side.
    3. Take the pan containing the egg to the sink and run cold water in to it until the egg is cool enough to handle. Crack the shell on a hard surfae, peel and put the egg in to a bowl.
    4. Add a little salt, the mayo, turmeric and coriander/cilantro. Mash with a fork until almost smooth.
    5. Heat the naan breads and lay the sausage on the first naan. Spoon on the egg mixture and spread evenly before topping with the second naan.

    World War II: Battle Of Britain

    Introduction

    German officers and soldiers had gazed from the French coastline across the 20 miles of the English Channel which separated them from their enemy. To a man, they knew that the conquest of Great Britain would be their greatest challenge to date. However, they were brimming with confidence. Operation Sealion, as the forthcoming invasion was codenamed, would involve the marshalling of troops and equipment, as well as the rounding up of enough barges suitable for transporting the most formidable fighting machine in the world across the narrow expanse of the Channel. Still, all of the victories thus far, all of the planning and all of theFuhrer’s bold rhetoric meant far less without mastery of the skies. Control of the air was a perquisite to any successful invasion.

    Battle Map

    A map of the theatre of battle. The big red line indicates the range of British radar.
    A map of the theatre of battle. The big red line indicates the range of British radar.
    Source: Hohum, PD, via Wikimedia Commons

    Kanalkampf

    Its opening phase was known asKanalkampf, or the Channel Battle, to the Germans. For the rest of the world, the aerial conflict which began on the 10th July 1940 and lasted fully 10 months was known collectively as the Battle of Britain. Less than three weeks after the Fall of France,Reichsmarschall Herman Goring and his Luftwaffe began the effort to take control of the skies above Britain. Hitler had initially set the date for the invasion as the 15th August, and the German planes were to pound British harbours and shipping.
    Goring had gathered more than 750 fighters, including the nimble but short range Messerschmitt Me-109 and the twin engine Me-110, to escort more than 1300 Heinkel He-111 and Dornier Do-17 bombers along with 300 of the infamous Junkers Ju-87 Stuka dive bombers which had sown destruction in Poland and France. Air Chief Marshal Hugh Dowding, chief of Royal Air Force Fighter Command in comparison could only muster around 700 Supermarine Spitfires, Hawker Hurricanes fighters and other obsolescent types in defence. During the ensuing four weeks, dogfights raged daily, a number of merchant ships were sunk by the marauding Germans and the Royal Navy relocated most of its ships and personnel to Portsmouth from Dover. The Luftwaffe failed, however, to sufficiently erode the strength of the Royal Air Force.
    Early in the battle the British came fully to appreciate the value of accurate intelligence and a new early warning device called radar, both of which provided advance notice to them of incoming German air raids. It was also quickly determined that the lumbering Stukas were unfit for air to air combat, proving to be easy prey for RAF fighters. Although they had lost 300 planes, while half that number of British aircraft had fallen, the Germans considered their initial operations sufficiently effective to begin round two of the aerial preparations for invasion.

    Der Adlertag

    Still confident of victory, German airmen often sang a jaunty tune with the lyric, ‘Wir fliefen gegen England’(‘we are flying against England’). Goring scheduled Adlertag, or Eagle Day, for the 13th August 1940. The second phase of the Battle of Britain was intended to bring the RAF to its knees, through the systematic bombing of its airfields in southern and central England, the destruction of the 300 foot towers and installations which comprised the early warning radar stations strung along the English coastline; and, finally, the elimination of the planes and pilots of Fighter Command.
    On Eagle Day itself, the Germans lost 46 planes, and the RAF 13. However, a week of nearly continuous daylight aerial combat followed. Citizens below could see the swirling vapour trails of the dogfighting planes. Occasionally they saw the puff of an exploding aircraft or the long, black trail of a burning machine as it hurtled towards the ground. At times, it actually seemed to be raining spent cartridges from machine guns and cannons of both sides. Though its actual losses may have been fewer than those of the Luftwaffe, Fighter Command was being stretched to breaking point. Young pilots were often thrown into combat with only a few hours of flying time, facilities had been bombed and strafed, and the rigours of combat had taken their toll on the remaining airworthy planes.

    The Ultimate Dogfight

    Adlertag, or Eagle Day remains one of the largest aerial engagements to date. And from this picture you can see why.
    Adlertag, or Eagle Day remains one of the largest aerial engagements to date. And from this picture you can see why.
    Source: Puttnam (Mr), War Office official photographer, PD, via Wikimedia Commons

    A Chance Reprieve

    In concert with daylight raids, Goring also instructed his pilots to fly nocturnal bombing missions against military targets in Britain. Major cities, particularly London, had not been targeted due to the probability of retaliation by RAF bombers against German cities. However, on the night of the 24th August 1940 a few Luftwaffe bombers strayed off course and dropped their ordinance on the city of London. The next night RAF bombers hit Berlin. Enraged, theFuhrer vowed to lay waste to British cities.
    On the 7th September 1940, Hitler authorised a change in strategy. TheLuftwaffe was to bomb London into submission. A week later, however, he postponed Operation Sealion indefinitely. On the first night of the Blitz more than 2000 Londoners were killed or wounded. The sacrifice of the civilian population proved to be the salvation of Fighter Command, which was given time to rest and refit. London was not the only city ravaged by German bombs in the months to come. On the night of the 14th November 1940, Coventry was assailed by more than 400 Luftwaffe bombers, killing 568 civilians and injuring more than 1200 others. Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester were hit. But the turning point had come with the change in German strategy and the refusal of the British people to buckle. The last Luftwaffe raids of the Blitz struck London on the night of the 10th May 1941.

    An Eastward Glance

    Hitler’s frustration with Goring’s failure to destroy the RAF was tempered by his preoccupation with preparations for OperationBarbarossa, the invasion of the Soviet Union which was scheduled for the 22nd June 1941. Some historians argue that the Fuhrer had been reluctant to continue fighting the British, hoping that his fellow Anglo Saxons might join in the war against the Soviet communists. At any rate, as early as the autumn of 1940 Hitler had concluded that the Battle of Britain could not be won. The opportunity for victory had been squandered and Luftwaffe losses continued to mount. British cities burnt, but the RAF remained a potent force.
    Prime Minister Winston Churchill hailed the spirit of the British people and called the time of peril and suffering ‘their finest hour.’ On the 20th August 1940, Churchill rose to address the House of Commons, praising the courage of the intrepid Royal Air Force pilots. ‘Never in the field of human conflict,’ he declared, ‘has so much been owed by so many to so few.’